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Addiction

NIDA Research Dissemination Center

NIDA Drug Pubs Research Dissemination Center distributes materials to virtually all audiences: drug abuse researchers, health professionals, teachers, advocacy groups, teenagers and the general public. Anyone interested in receiving the latest scientific information about drug abuse and addiction can call 1-877-NIDA-NIH (1-877-643-2644), or 1-240-645-0228 (TDD). Order requests can be placed online or can also be e-mailed to:drugpubs@nida.nih.gov or faxed to 240-645-0227.

Review Date: August 23, 2011

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Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration - SAMHSA
U.S. Department of Health and Human Services

Inquiries on mental health, drug abuse, or alcohol can be directed to the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA) , formerly the Alcohol, Drug Abuse and Mental Health Administration (ADAMHA). Requests for publications should be directed to the information offices listed in the General Notes (GN) field of this database record.

Review Date: June 13, 2011

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National Council on Alcoholism and Drug Dependence, Inc.

The National Council on Alcoholism and Drug Dependence, Inc.(NCADD), founded in 1944, is a national, nonprofit organization combating alcoholism, other drug addictions, and related problems. NCADD's major programs include prevention and education, public information, public policy advocacy, and publications. NCADD's network of more than 100 State and local nonprofit affiliates conduct similar activities in their areas and provide information and referral services to families and individuals seeking help with an alcohol- or other drug-related problem. NCADD sponsors National Alcohol Awareness Month in April and Alcohol and Other Drug-Related Birth Defects Week in May. NCADD operates a toll-free number, (800)NCA-CALL, for information about alcoholism and the name of the NCADD affiliate in your area.

Review Date: June 26, 2008

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Overeaters Anonymous, Inc.

Overeaters Anonymous (OA), found in 1960, is a twelve-step recovery program patterned after Alcoholics Anonymous. The specific and primary purpose of the corporation is to aid those with the problem of compulsive overeating to overcome that problem through a Twelve-step program of recovery. The general purpose and power is to promote the public health and to work with and furnish charitable and cultural assistance to those with problems of obesity. No membership dues or fees are required for participation in OA. The organization is self-supporting through members’ voluntary donations and the sale of OA literature.

Review Date: October 27, 2011

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Phoenix House Center on Addiction and the Family

The Phoenix House Center on Addiction and the Family (COAF) – formerly the Children of Alcoholics Foundation – was established in 1982 to help children and adults from addicted families. COAF’s mission is to help children of all ages from alcoholic and substance abusing families reach their full potential by breaking the cycle of parental substance abuse and reducing the pain and problems that result from parental addiction. To realize this goal, COAF, an affiliate of Phoenix House since 1997, develops curriculum and other educational materials, writes reports, provides information about parental substance abuse for the general public, trains professionals, and promotes research.

Review Date: April 14, 2011

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Sexaholics Anonymous

Sexaholics Anonymous (SA) is a fellowship of men and women who share their experience, strength, and hope with each other so that they may solve their common problem. SA is not a sex or group therapy and offers no treatment -- it is a program of recovery for those who want to stop their sexually self-destructive thinking and behavior. SA's support group philosophy is taken directly from the Twelve Steps and Twelve Traditions of Alcoholics Anonymous.

Review Date: February 14, 2013

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