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Radiation Emergencies

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention - CDC
U.S. Department of Health and Human Services

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), a part of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, is the primary Federal agency for conducting and supporting public health activities in the United States. CDC's Mission is to collaborate to create the expertise, information, and tools that people and communities need to protect their health – through health promotion, prevention of disease, injury and disability, and preparedness for new health threats. CDC is composed of the Office of the Director, the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health, Center for Global Health, and five Offices, including Public Health Preparedness and Response; State and Local Support; Surveillance, Epidemiology and Laboratory Services; Noncommunicable Diseases, Injury and Environmental Health; and Infectious Diseases. CDC employs more than 15,000 employees in more than 50 countries and in 168 occupational categories.

Review Date: February 27, 2013

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Office of Air and Radiation, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency

Some of EPA's top priorities are to improve air quality, take action on climate change, and clean up our communities. EPA's work on these priorities falls under the Clean Air Act and includes developing national programs, technical policies and regulations for controlling air pollution and radiation exposure. These efforts help protect the health of all Americans by preventing pollution and increasing energy efficiency, improving indoor and outdoor air quality, reducing industrial air pollution and pollution from vehicles and engines, protecting the stratospheric ozone layer, reducing acid rain, and addressing climate change.

Review Date: April 28, 2011

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Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management, U.S. Department of Energy

The mission of this division of the Department of Energy is to provide for the timely disposal of the Nation's nuclear waste in a geologic repository, in a manner that protects the health and safety of the public and workers, and maintains the quality of the environment.

Review Date: October 12, 2011

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U.S. Environmental Protection Agency

The mission of the EPA is to protect human health and to safeguard the natural environment--air, water, and land--upon which life depends. Through the work of its many projects and programs the EPA's purpose is to ensure that: all Americans are protected from significant risks to human health and the environment where they live, learn and work; national efforts to reduce environmental risk are based on the best available scientific information; federal laws protecting human health and the environment are enforced fairly and effectively; environmental protection is an integral consideration in U.S. policies concerning natural resources, human health, economic growth, energy, transportation, agriculture, industry, and international trade, and these factors are similarly considered in establishing environmental policy; all parts of society--communities, individuals, business, state and local governments, tribal governments--have access to accurate information sufficient to effectively participate in managing human health and environmental risks; environmental protection contributes to making our communities and ecosystems diverse, sustainable and economically productive; the United States plays a leadership role in working with other nations to protect the global environment.

Review Date: December 28, 2010

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World Health Organization

The World Health Organization (WHO) came into being on April 7, 1948 when the 26th United Nations member ratified its Constitution. The objective of WHO is the attainment by all peoples of the highest possible level of health. In support of its main objective, the WHO has a wide range of functions including the following: to act as the directing and coordinating authority on international health work; to promote technical cooperation; to assist Governments, upon request, in strengthening health services; to furnish appropriate technical assistance, and in emergencies, necessary aid; to stimulate and advance work on the prevention and control of epidemic, endemic and other diseases; to promote, in cooperation with other specialized agencies where necessary, the improvement of nutrition, housing, sanitation, recreation, economic or working conditions and other aspects of environmental hygiene; to promote and coordinate biomedical and health services research; to promote improved standards of teaching and training in the health, medical and related professions; to establish and stimulate the establishment of international standards for biological, pharmaceutical and similar products, and to standardize diagnostic procedures; and to foster activities in the field of mental health, especially those activities affecting the harmony of human relations. WHO also proposes conventions, agreements, regulations and makes recommendations about international nomenclature of diseases, causes of death and public health practices. It develops, establishes and promotes international standards concerning foods and biological, pharmaceutical and similar substances.

Review Date: January 05, 2009

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