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Vaccines

Get a Pneumonia Shot

Pneumonia is a serious illness. It can lead to infections of the lungs, the blood, or the brain. Don’t wait – talk to your doctor about the pneumonia shot.

Review Date: January 31, 2013

National Health Information Center - NHIC
U.S. Department of Health and Human Services

Get Important Shots

Learn what shots (vaccinations) are recommended for adults and can help you stay healthy.

Review Date: February 14, 2013

National Health Information Center - NHIC
U.S. Department of Health and Human Services

Get Your Child’s Shots on Schedule

Shots (also called vaccinations or immunizations) work best when they are given at certain ages. Find out which shots your child needs.

Review Date: January 31, 2013

National Health Information Center - NHIC
U.S. Department of Health and Human Services

Get Your Pre-Teen's Shots on Schedule

Doctors recommend that 11 and 12 year olds get important shots (vaccines). Schedule a checkup for your pre-teen.

Review Date: January 31, 2013

National Health Information Center - NHIC
U.S. Department of Health and Human Services

HPV Vaccine: Questions for Your Child's Doctor

Start a conversation with your child’s doctor about the HPV vaccine.

Review Date: January 31, 2013

National Health Information Center - NHIC
U.S. Department of Health and Human Services

National Immunization Awareness Month Toolkit

The National Immunization Awareness Month toolkit offers information and ideas on how to promote immunizations and remind family, friends, and coworkers to get caught up on their shots.

Review Date: March 07, 2013

National Health Information Center - NHIC
U.S. Department of Health and Human Services

Prevent Infections When You Get Medical Care

Get tips on protecting yourself from infections when you get medical care.

Review Date: January 31, 2013

National Health Information Center - NHIC
U.S. Department of Health and Human Services

Protect Yourself from Seasonal Flu

The seasonal flu vaccine is the best way to protect yourself and others from the flu. Get a flu shot every year.

Review Date: January 31, 2013

National Health Information Center - NHIC
U.S. Department of Health and Human Services

Flu Vaccine: 2012-2013 Season

Find out where to get a flu shot this season, and learn about vaccine safety, possible side effects, and more.

Review Date: January 31, 2013

U.S. Department of Health and Human Services

Infant Immunizations FAQs

Get answers to common questions about babies and vaccines.

Review Date: January 31, 2013

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention - CDC
U.S. Department of Health and Human Services

Childhood Immunization Scheduler (for children six years and younger)

Get the best protection for your child—make sure your child is immunized on schedule. For a complete list of recommended immunizations, just select your child’s birth date.

Review Date: January 31, 2013

National Center for Immunization and Respiratory Diseases - NCIRD
Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

Questions and Answers: Problem Reporting of Products Regulated by FDA

Consumers can play an important public health role by reporting adverse reactions or other problems with products the FDA regulates. Find answers to questions about reporting a problem.

Review Date: January 31, 2013

U.S. Food and Drug Administration

Interim Immunization Recommendations for Individuals Displaced by a Disaster

The CDC discusses their recommendations for immunizing people who have been displaced by a disaster, such as an earthquake or hurricane. In addition to the vaccines given routinely, several vaccines are suggested for evacuees living in crowded group settings.

Review Date: January 31, 2013

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention - CDC
U.S. Department of Health and Human Services

Adolescent and Adult Vaccine Quiz

Did you know that certain vaccines are recommended for adults and adolescents? Take this quiz to find out which vaccines you may need.

Review Date: January 31, 2013

National Center for Immunization and Respiratory Diseases - NCIRD
Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

After the Shots: What to Do If Your Child Has Discomfort- (PDF)

Find out what to do if your child has discomfort after the shot.

Review Date: January 31, 2013

Immunization Action Coalition

American Indian / Alaskan Native Vaccination

Learn how vaccinations help ensure the safety and health of American Indian and Alaska Native (AI/AN) communities. Information on vaccine-preventable diseases, where immunizations are provided, vaccination coverage levels, and publications provided.

Review Date: January 31, 2013

National Center for Immunization and Respiratory Diseases - NCIRD
Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

Anthrax Vaccine Facts

This Department of Defense site provides information on the threat of anthrax as a weapon, the disease caused by anthrax, and the anthrax vaccine.

Review Date: January 31, 2013

U.S. Department of Defense

Causes and Prevention of Intellectual Disabilities

Although not all intellectual disabilities can be prevented, there are some that can be prevented through newborn screening, immunization and prenatal care. Learn more about it.

Review Date: January 31, 2013

The Arc

Childhood Vaccines: What They Are and Why Your Child Needs Them

Vaccines not only help keep your child healthy, they help all children by eliminating serious childhood diseases. Learn about the different types of vaccines and when your child needs to be vaccinated.

Review Date: January 31, 2013

American Academy of Family Physicians

Diphtheria-Tetanus- Pertussis Vaccines: What You Need to Know- (PDF)

Diphtheria, tetanus, and pertussis are serious diseases caused by bacteria that can be prevented by getting the DTaP vaccine. Learn who should get DTaP vaccine and when, potential risks, and what to do if you have an allergic reaction.

Review Date: January 31, 2013

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention - CDC
U.S. Department of Health and Human Services

Fast Facts for Families: Pertussis, A Family Affair- (PDF)

Learn how immunity against pertussis (whooping cough) is only obtained after a child has received all of the required doses. This brochure illustrates the importance of immunization for everyone in contact with infants and small children.

Review Date: January 31, 2013

National Healthy Mothers, Healthy Babies Coalition

Find a Flu Shot

The 2012-2013 flu vaccine will be available starting in September and October 2012. Simply enter your zip code to find mapped locations, dates, times, addresses and phone numbers for clinics offering flu shots near you.

Review Date: January 31, 2013

American Lung Association

Find a Yellow Fever Vaccination Clinic

If travel plans include visits to countries where yellow fever vaccination may be required for entry, visit this resource to find the nearest authorized U.S. yellow fever vaccine center.

Review Date: January 31, 2013

Division of Global Migration and Quarantine, National Center for Emerging and Zoonotic Infectious Diseases, CDC

Global Travel Clinic Directory

More than 500 travel medicine clinics representing over 40 countries are included in this directory. Health care providers, the travel industry, and the public can use this directory to locate health care professionals with an expertise in travel medicine.

Review Date: January 31, 2013

International Society of Travel Medicine

Hepatitis A Vaccine- (PDF)

Hepatitis A is a serious liver disease caused by the Hepatitis A virus (HAV). Hepatitis A vaccine can prevent hepatitis A.

Review Date: January 31, 2013

Immunization Action Coalition

Hepatitis B Vaccine- (PDF)

Hepatitis B vaccine, usually a three-dose series, is recommended for all children 0-18 years of age. Learn how Hepatitis B, a liver disease, is spread and prevented, and steps to take if you have been exposed to HBV or have chronic HBV infection.

Review Date: January 31, 2013

Immunization Action Coalition

HIV/AIDS and the Flu

Find questions and answers about both flu shots and antiviral medications recommended for people with HIV/AIDS.

Review Date: February 08, 2013

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention - CDC
U.S. Department of Health and Human Services

HPV Vaccines

HPV vaccines are given as three shots to protect against HPV infection and HPV-related diseases. HPV vaccines offer the greatest health benefits to individuals who receive all three doses before having any type of sexual activity. That’s why HPV vaccination is recommended for preteen girls and boys at age 11 or 12 years.

Review Date: January 31, 2013

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention - CDC
U.S. Department of Health and Human Services

Measles, Mumps, and Rubella Vaccine- (PDF)

Measles, mumps, and rubella (MMR) are serious diseases which spread from person to person through the air. Learn about each disease and how each can be prevented by the MMR vaccine.

Review Date: January 31, 2013

Immunization Action Coalition

Meningococcal Vaccine for Preteens and Teens

Read about the meningococcal conjugate vaccine (MCV4) including who should and should not get this vaccine, when they should be vaccinated, and the risks and benefits of this vaccine.

Review Date: January 31, 2013

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention - CDC
U.S. Department of Health and Human Services

National Vaccine Injury Compensation Program

The National Vaccine Injury Compensation Program (VICP) was established to ensure an adequate supply of vaccines, stabilize vaccine costs, and establish and maintain an accessible and efficient forum for individuals found to be injured by certain vaccines.

Review Date: January 31, 2013

Healthcare Systems Bureau, Health Resources and Services Administration

National Vaccine Program Office: 10 Tips on Evaluating Immunization Information on the Internet

How do you know if vaccine information you find on the Internet or in other sources is accurate? Follow these 10 guidelines when looking for information about immunizations on the Internet.

Review Date: January 31, 2013

National Vaccine Program Office, U.S Department of Health and Human Services

Pneumococcal Conjugate Vaccine- (PDF)

Pneumococcal infections can cause blood infections, pneumonia, and bacterial meningitis, mostly in young children. Learn why the Pneumococcal Conjugate Vaccine (PCV) is important for prevention of these diseases.

Review Date: January 31, 2013

Immunization Action Coalition

Pneumococcal Shots

The pneumococcal vaccine can be given at any time of year and most people need this shot only once in their lifetime. Some high risk people need a booster vaccine. Medicare will also cover a booster vaccine for high risk people if 5 years have passed since the last vaccination.

Review Date: January 31, 2013

Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services

Pneumonia Can Be Prevented – Vaccines Can Help

Pneumonia is an infection of the lungs that can cause mild to severe illness in people of all ages. Learn about vaccines and good hygiene practices that can help you stay healthy.

Review Date: January 31, 2013

National Center for Immunization and Respiratory Diseases - NCIRD
Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

Possible Side-effects from Vaccines

Being vaccinated is much safer than contracting the disease vaccines prevent. This page answers some common questions about vaccine side effects and describes the mild, moderate, and severe side effects associated with specific vaccines.

Review Date: January 31, 2013

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention - CDC
U.S. Department of Health and Human Services

Protect Yourself Against Shingles: Get Vaccinated

If you are age 60 years or older, ask your doctor about the shingles vaccine.

Review Date: January 31, 2013

National Center for Immunization and Respiratory Diseases - NCIRD
Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

Tdap Vaccine for Preteens and Teens

Read about the Tdap vaccine including who should and should not get this vaccine, when they should be vaccinated, and the risks and benefits of this vaccine.

Review Date: January 31, 2013

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention - CDC
U.S. Department of Health and Human Services

Ten Reasons To Be Vaccinated

Many people don’t realize the important role vaccines can play in keeping adults healthy. Find ten reasons why vaccination is important for adults.

Review Date: January 31, 2013

National Foundation for Infectious Diseases

Tetanus

Tetanus is a serious bacterial disease that affects your nervous system. If you're traveling internationally, it's a good idea to have up-to-date immunity because tetanus may be more common where you're visiting, especially if you're traveling to a developing country.

Review Date: January 31, 2013

Mayo Foundation for Medical Education and Research

Travelers' Health - Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

Find information, based on scientific studies, disease surveillance, and best practices, to assist travelers and their health-care providers in deciding the vaccines, medications, and other measures necessary to prevent illness and injury during international travel.

Review Date: July 06, 2011

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention - CDC
U.S. Department of Health and Human Services

Vaccinations for Adults: You’re Never Too Old to Get Immunized- (PDF)

Many adults don't know they are supposed to get immunized against diseases. They think vaccinations are for kids. There are millions of adults in this country who need influenza, pneumococcal, tetanus, diphtheria, hepatitis B, and other vaccines. Are you one of them?

Review Date: January 31, 2013

Immunization Action Coalition

Vaccine Adverse Event Reporting System (VAERS)

This site provides details for reporting adverse events which may be associated with vaccines, and discusses the National Childhood Vaccine Injury Act. VAERS is a joint program of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and the Food and Drug Administration.

Review Date: January 31, 2013

Center for Biologics Evaluation and Research (CBER)

Vaccine Information Statements

Vaccine Information Statements (VISs) are information sheets produced by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) that explain to vaccine recipients, their parents, or their legal representatives both the benefits and risks of a vaccine.

Review Date: January 31, 2013

National Center for Immunization and Respiratory Diseases - NCIRD
Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

Vaccines & Preventable Diseases

This page provides information on vaccines and the diseases they prevent.

Review Date: January 31, 2013

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention - CDC
U.S. Department of Health and Human Services

Vaccines for Uninsured Children

Find out if your child qualifies for free shots.

Review Date: January 31, 2013

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention - CDC
U.S. Department of Health and Human Services

Vaccines.gov

Vaccines.gov is the federal gateway to information on vaccines and immunization for infants, children, teenagers, adults, and seniors. Learn about vaccine safety, diseases that can be prevented, vaccination schedules, travel tips, and more.

Review Date: January 31, 2013

U.S. Department of Health and Human Services

What If You Don't Immunize Your Child?- (PDF)

Vaccines were developed to protect individuals from dangerous and sometimes deadly diseases. Without immunizations, your child is at greater risk of catching one of the vaccine-preventable diseases.

Review Date: January 31, 2013

Immunization Action Coalition

What Would Happen If We Stopped Vaccinations?

Vaccine-preventable diseases have a costly impact, resulting in doctor visits, hospitalizations, and premature deaths. Learn more about the importance of immunization against many infectious diseases such as chickenpox, measles, polio, Hepatitis B, and more.

Review Date: January 31, 2013

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention - CDC
U.S. Department of Health and Human Services

Where to Find Vaccination / Immunization Records

If you have trouble finding your child’s immunization records, try these tips.

Review Date: January 31, 2013

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention - CDC
U.S. Department of Health and Human Services

Zostavax (Herpes Zoster Vaccine) Questions and Answers

Zostavax is an FDA licensed vaccine that helps to reduce the risk of getting herpes zoster (shingles) in individuals 50 years of age and older.

Review Date: January 31, 2013

U.S. Food and Drug Administration