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Diarrhea

National Center for Emerging and Zoonotic Infectious Diseases, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

CDC's National Center for Emerging and Zoonotic Infectious Diseases (NCEZID) aims to detect, prevent, and control infectious diseases from spreading, whether they are naturally occurring, unintentional, or the result of terrorism. With a focus on diseases that have been around for many years, emerging diseases (those that are new or just recently identified), and zoonotic diseases (those spread from animals to people), NCEZID's work recognizes the vital interconnectedness of microbes and the environment, and involves many scientific disciplines to attain better health for humans and animals and improve our environment. Each of the center’s seven divisions works with partners to protect and improve the public’s health in the United States and worldwide.

Review Date: July 18, 2011

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NIH National Digestive Diseases Information Clearinghouse

The National Digestive Diseases Information Clearinghouse (NDDIC) is an information dissemination service of the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases (NIDDK). The NIDDK is part of the National Institutes of Health (NIH), which is part of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. NDDIC was established in 1980 to increase knowledge and understanding about digestive diseases among people with these conditions and their families, health care professionals, and the general public. To carry out this mission, NDDIC works closely with a coordinating panel of representatives from Federal agencies, voluntary organizations on the national level, and professional groups to identify and respond to informational needs about digestive diseases.

Review Date: July 13, 2011

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American Academy of Family Physicians

The American Academy of Family Physicians (AAFP), originally the American Academy of General Practice, was founded in 1947 and has chapters in all States. Its purpose is to represent the interests of family physicians, provide opportunities for continuing education, and maintain high standards of family practice care. AAFP requires continuing education from its members and promotes the development of family practice medical education. A public education program is conducted to inform the public about family practice. Other activities include medical student services, annual meetings, and reduced insurance rates.

Review Date: July 01, 2009

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American College of Gastroenterology

ACG was formed in 1932 to advance the scientific study and medical treatment of disorders of the gastrointestinal tract. The College promotes the highest standards in medical education and is guided by its commitment to meeting the needs of clinical gastroenterology practitioners. More than 12,000 physicians from 82 countries are members of the ACG.

Review Date: September 16, 2011

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American Gastroenterological Association

The American Gastroenterological Association (AGA) has over 17,000 members from around the globe who are involved in all aspects of the science, practice and advancement of gastroenterology. The AGA, a 501(c6) organization, administers all membership and public policy activities, while the AGA Institute, a 501(c3) organization, runs the organization’s practice, research and educational programs.

Review Date: November 25, 2011

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International Foundation for Functional Gastrointestinal Disorders

The International Foundation for Functional Gastrointestinal Disorders(IFFGD) is a nonprofit education and research organization that addresses the issues surrounding adult and pediatric gastrointestinal diseases. Diseases addressed include irritable bowel syndrome (IBS), gastroesophagealreflux disease (GERD), fecal incontinence, Hirschsprung's disease, chronicintestinal pseudo-obstruction, as well as several others. IFFGD isdedicated to finding a cause and a cure for these disorders. IFFGD offers support and educational services to affected people, their families,healthcare professionals, and the general public.

Review Date: August 30, 2012

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Wound, Ostomy and Continence Nurses Society

Wound, Ostomy and Continence Nursing Society (WOCN) is a professional, international nursing society of nurse professionals who are experts in the care of patients with wound, ostomy and continence problems. WOC nurses manage conditions such as stomas, draining wounds, fistulas, vascular ulcers, pressure ulcers, neuropathic wounds, urinary incontinence, fecal incontinence, and functional disorders of the bowel and bladder. The WOCN Society is deeply involved in setting guidelines for patient care.

Review Date: October 27, 2011

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