U.S. Department of Health and Human Services

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Elder Abuse

Administration on Aging

The Administration on Aging (AoA) is the Federal agency responsible for advancing the concerns and interests of older people and their caregivers. AoA works with and through the Aging Services Network to promote the development of a comprehensive and coordinated system of home and community-based long-term care that is responsive to the needs and preferences of older people and their family caregivers. AoA is part of the Department of Health and Human Services and is headed by the Assistant Secretary for Aging, who reports directly to the Secretary.

Review Date: July 28, 2011

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National Center on Elder Abuse

The National Center on Elder Abuse (NCEA) serves as a national resource center dedicated to the prevention of elder mistreatment. First established by the U.S. Administration on Aging (AoA) in 1988 as a national elder abuse resource center, the NCEA was granted a permanent home at AoA in the 1992 amendments made to Title II of the Older Americans Act. To carry out its mission, the NCEA disseminates elder abuse information to professionals and the public, and provides technical assistance and training to states and to community-based organizations.

Review Date: June 30, 2011

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NIH National Institute on Aging

NIA, one of the 27 Institutes and Centers of NIH, leads a broad scientific effort to understand the nature of aging and to extend the healthy, active years of life. In 1974, Congress granted authority to form NIA to provide leadership in aging research, training, health information dissemination, and other programs relevant to aging and older people. Subsequent amendments to this legislation designated the NIA as the primary Federal agency on Alzheimer’s disease research. The Institute's mission is to: •Support and conduct genetic, biological, clinical, behavioral, social, and economic research related to the aging process, diseases and conditions associated with aging, and other special problems and needs of older Americans. •Foster the development of research and clinician scientists in aging. •Communicate information about aging and advances in research on aging to the scientific community, health care providers, and the public.

Review Date: July 14, 2014

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NIH National Institute on Aging

NIA, one of the 27 Institutes and Centers of NIH, leads a broad scientific effort to understand the nature of aging and to extend the healthy, active years of life. In 1974, Congress granted authority to form NIA to provide leadership in aging research, training, health information dissemination, and other programs relevant to aging and older people. Subsequent amendments to this legislation designated the NIA as the primary Federal agency on Alzheimer’s disease research. The Institute's mission is to: •Support and conduct genetic, biological, clinical, behavioral, social, and economic research related to the aging process, diseases and conditions associated with aging, and other special problems and needs of older Americans. •Foster the development of research and clinician scientists in aging. •Communicate information about aging and advances in research on aging to the scientific community, health care providers, and the public.

Review Date: July 14, 2014

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NIH National Institute on Aging Information Center

Health Information publications from the National Institute on Aging can be ordered online. You can search or browse to find titles at http://www.nia.nih.gov/HealthInformation/Publications.

Review Date: June 16, 2011

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Gray Panthers

The Gray Panthers, organized in 1970, is a national organization of intergenerational activists dedicated to social change. Whether at the local, state or federal level, Gray Panthers fight to change laws and attitudes for social justice. Major issues of concern include: health care, Social Security, civil rights and anti-discrimination (ageism, sexism, racism), environment, and peace. Accomplishments range from having initiated fights against forced retirement at age 65, to exposing nursing home abuse, and working in coalition for Universal Health Care.

Review Date: September 15, 2011

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National Council on Child Abuse and Family Violence

NCCAFV is a nonprofit 501(c)(3) corporation serving all fifty states, Puerto Rico and the U.S. Virgin Islands. NCCAFV's commitment is to intergenerational family violence prevention -- of child abuse, domestic violence (spouse/partner abuse) and elder abuse. NCCAFV provides public awareness and education materials, program and resource development consultation, and technical assistance and training in the United States and internationally.

Review Date: April 14, 2011

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National Organization for Victim Assistance

The National Organization for Victim Assistance is a private, non-profit, 501(c)(3) organization of victim and witness assistance programs and practitioners, criminal justice agencies and professionals, mental health professionals, researchers, former victims and survivors, and others committed to the recognition and implementation of victim rights and services. NOVA serves as a national forum for victim advocacy in support of victim oriented legislation and public policy. In addition, NOVA serves individual victims and witnesses of crime, supports local victim assistance programs, and sponsors conferences and forums on victim assistance issues. The organization is supported by grants and membership fees and the sale of pamphlets and books from its information clearinghouse. NOVA also provides training and direct support to victims and survivors of disasters via its National Crisis Response Team project.

Review Date: December 27, 2010

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National Resource Center for American Indian, Alaska Native and Native Hawaiian Elders

The National Resource Center (NRC) for American Indian, Alaska Native & Native Hawaiian Elders is a grant project of the U.S. Administration on Aging. The goals of this project are to: assess the current status of Native Elders in Alaska; develop an understanding of the cultural values that drive expectations and perceived needs for care; and document "best, promising and emerging practices" that are in current use. Additional goals include soliciting recommendations for community responses to elder abuse, exploitation and violence that are appropriate to Alaska Native cultures and providing education to medical providers.

Review Date: October 13, 2011

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