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Infectious Diseases

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention - CDC
U.S. Department of Health and Human Services

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), a part of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, is the primary Federal agency for conducting and supporting public health activities in the United States. CDC's Mission is to collaborate to create the expertise, information, and tools that people and communities need to protect their health – through health promotion, prevention of disease, injury and disability, and preparedness for new health threats. CDC is composed of the Office of the Director, the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health, Center for Global Health, and five Offices, including Public Health Preparedness and Response; State and Local Support; Surveillance, Epidemiology and Laboratory Services; Noncommunicable Diseases, Injury and Environmental Health; and Infectious Diseases. CDC employs more than 15,000 employees in more than 50 countries and in 168 occupational categories.

Review Date: February 27, 2013

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Division of Global Migration and Quarantine, National Center for Emerging and Zoonotic Infectious Diseases, CDC

The Division of Global Migration and Quarantine (DGMQ) is a division of the CDC's National Center for Emerging and Zoonotic Infectious Diseases (NCEZID). DGMQ has statutory responsibility to make and enforce regulations necessary to prevent the introduction, transmission, or spread of communicable diseases from foreign countries into the United States. DGMQ achieves its mission through Immigrant, Refugee and Migrant Health, Quarantine and Border Health Services, Animal Importation, Travelers' Health, Policy and Regulatory Affairs, Community Interventions for Infection Control, and United States-Mexico Health activities.

Review Date: July 18, 2011

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Division of Viral Hepatitis, National Center for HIV/AIDS, Viral Hepatitis, STD, and TB Prevention

The Division of Viral Hepatitis (DVH) is part of the National Center for HIV/AIDS, Viral Hepatitis, STD, and TB Prevention at CDC. In collaboration with domestic and global partners, DVH provides the scientific and programmatic foundation and leadership for the prevention and control of hepatitis virus infections and their manifestations. DVH consists of three branches — the Epidemiology and Surveillance Branch, the Prevention Branch, and the Laboratory Branch — that work collaboratively to prevent viral hepatitis infections and associated liver disease.

Review Date: July 25, 2011

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National Center for Emerging and Zoonotic Infectious Diseases

The National Center for Emerging and Zoonotic Infectious Diseases (NCEZID) aims to prevent disease, disability, and death caused by a wide range of infectious diseases. NCEZID focuses on diseases that have been around for many years, emerging diseases (those that are new or just recently identified), and zoonotic diseases (those spread from animals to people). Work is guided in part by a holistic "One Health" strategy, which recognizes the vital interconnectedness of microbes and the environment. Through a comprehensive approach involving many scientific disciplines, better health for humans and animals and an improved environment can be attained.

Review Date: November 30, 2010

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National Center for Emerging and Zoonotic Infectious Diseases, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

CDC's National Center for Emerging and Zoonotic Infectious Diseases (NCEZID) aims to detect, prevent, and control infectious diseases from spreading, whether they are naturally occurring, unintentional, or the result of terrorism. With a focus on diseases that have been around for many years, emerging diseases (those that are new or just recently identified), and zoonotic diseases (those spread from animals to people), NCEZID's work recognizes the vital interconnectedness of microbes and the environment, and involves many scientific disciplines to attain better health for humans and animals and improve our environment. Each of the center’s seven divisions works with partners to protect and improve the public’s health in the United States and worldwide.

Review Date: July 18, 2011

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National Center for HIV, STD, and TB Prevention, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

CDC's National Center for HIV/AIDS, Viral Hepatitis, STD, and TB Prevention maximizes public health and safety nationally and internationally through the elimination, prevention, and control of disease, disability, and death caused by HIV/AIDS, Viral Hepatitis, STDs and TB. Center staff work in collaboration with governmental and nongovernmental partners at community, State, national, and international levels, applying well-integrated multidisciplinary programs of research, surveillance, technical assistance, and evaluation.

Review Date: August 10, 2011

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National Center for Immunization and Respiratory Diseases - NCIRD
Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

The mission of the National Center for Immunization and Respiratory Diseases (NCIRD) is the prevention of disease, disability, and death through immunization and by control of respiratory and related diseases. NCIRD balances its efforts in the domestic and global arenas as well as accommodates the specific needs of all populations at risk of vaccine preventable diseases from children to older adults.

Review Date: August 10, 2011

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NIH National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases – NIAID

NIAID conducts and supports basic and applied research to better understand, treat, and ultimately prevent infectious, immunologic, and allergic diseases. For more than 60 years, NIAID research has led to new therapies, vaccines, diagnostic tests, and other technologies that have improved the health of millions of people in the United States and around the world.

Review Date: July 20, 2011

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U.S. Department of Health and Human Services

The Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) is the United States government’s principal agency for protecting the health of all Americans and providing essential human services, especially for those who are least able to help themselves. HHS works closely with state and local governments, and many HHS-funded services are provided at the local level by state or county agencies, or through private sector grantees. The department includes more than 300 programs, covering a wide spectrum of activities. In addition to the services they deliver, the HHS programs provide for equitable treatment of beneficiaries nationwide, and they enable the collection of national health and other data.

Review Date: August 30, 2011

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American Lyme Disease Foundation, Inc.

The American Lyme Disease Foundation, Inc. is dedicated to the prevention, diagnosis and treatment of Lyme disease and other tick-borne infections. The Foundation plays a key role in providing reliable and scientifically accurate information to the public, medical community and government agencies about tick-borne diseases and their effects on human health and quality of life.

Review Date: June 14, 2011

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American Society for Microbiology

The American Society for Microbiology is the oldest and largest single life science membership organization in the world. The members represent 26 disciplines of microbiological specialization plus a division for microbiology educators. The mission of the American Society for Microbiology is to advance the microbiological sciences as a vehicle for understanding life processes and to apply and communicate this knowledge for the improvement of health and environmental and economic well being worldwide.

Review Date: December 19, 2011

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American Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene

This organization represents scientists, clinicians and others with interests in the prevention and control of tropical diseases through research and education. The interests of the Society lie in tropical medicine, including the varied parasitic and viral diseases of the tropics, as well as other infectious diseases, such as enteric and mycobacterial infections. Membership in ASTMH include persons with clinical, epidemiological, and basic biochemical, immunologic and molecular approaches to diseases and pathogens.

Review Date: February 13, 2009

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Division of Parasitic Diseases and Malaria, Center for Global Health

CDC's Division of Parasitic Diseases and Malaria (DPDM) prevents and controls parasitic diseases in the United States and throughout the world by providing diagnostic, consultative, and epidemiologic services and training.

Review Date: September 07, 2011

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Division of Vector-Borne Diseases, National Center for Zoonotic, Vector-Borne, and Enteric Diseases/CDC

The Division of Vector-Borne Diseases (DVBD) strives to protect the nation from bacterial and viral diseases transmitted by mosquitoes, ticks and fleas. Some of these diseases have long been present in the United States while others have recently emerged. These include some of the world's most destructive diseases, many of which are increasing threats to human health as the environment changes and globalization increases. CDC/DVBD plays a unique role, housing much of the world’s expertise in the diagnosis, prevention and control of these diseases.

Review Date: July 25, 2011

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Jesse Cause Foundation

The Jesse Cause is named after Chris and Shelene Keith’s son Jesse, who was born with Group B strep (GBS). The couple founded the non-profit organization in hopes of sparing other families the devastating effects of GBS. The Jesse Cause Foundation worked closely with the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) to ensure that nationwide testing of all pregnant women for Group B strep became a standard of care during pregnancy. The Web site offers resources on GBS for medical professionals, expectant parents, and families affected by GBS. The "Save Our Babies Project" is dedicated to bringing awareness of Group B strep to every city and state.

Review Date: October 05, 2010

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Meningitis Foundation of America, Inc.

The Meningitis Foundation of America Inc. (MFA) is a non-profit organization established to help support sufferers and their families; to provide information to educate everyone about Meningitis so that it's early diagnosis and treatment will save lives; and to provide medical personnel with information to help them understand and treat the disease.

Review Date: September 07, 2011

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National Center for Preparedness, Detection, and Control of Infectious Diseases, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

The National Center for Preparedness, Detection, and Control of Infectious Diseases (NCPDCID)provides leadership and brings many partners together to protect the world from infectious diseases. This organization aims to detect, prevent, and control infectious diseases from spreading, whether they are naturally occurring, unintentional, or the result of terrorism. NCPDCID works in the United States and abroad to establish safe and high-quality healthcare, laboratory services, surveillance systems, and networks that share vital information about infectious diseases.

Review Date: March 27, 2009

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National Foundation for Infectious Diseases

The National Foundation for Infectious Diseases (NFID) is a non-profit, tax-exempt (501c3) organization founded in 1973 and dedicated to educating the public and healthcare professionals about the causes, treatment and prevention of infectious diseases. NFID and the National Coalition for Adult Immunization sponsor an influenza and pneumococcal immunization awareness campaign annually to remind millions of Americans of the risks of influenza and pneumococcal disease, and ways of preventing them or their complications.

Review Date: June 21, 2011

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Pan American Health Organization

The Pan American Health Organization (PAHO), Regional Office for the Americas of the World Health Organization (WHO), was formerly known as the International Sanitary Bureau. It is composed of 35 member governments in the Americas and three European governments. PAHO, in its centennial year of existence, serves the health needs of the population of the Americas. The Organization continuously strives to address the health problems and inequities of the Americas, so that all citizens of the Region may lead socially and economically productive lives. PAHO's website provides general information about both itself and WHO, answers inquiries, and provides information on a variety of international health subjects in English and in Spanish.

Review Date: July 01, 2008

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World Health Organization

The World Health Organization (WHO) came into being on April 7, 1948 when the 26th United Nations member ratified its Constitution. The objective of WHO is the attainment by all peoples of the highest possible level of health. In support of its main objective, the WHO has a wide range of functions including the following: to act as the directing and coordinating authority on international health work; to promote technical cooperation; to assist Governments, upon request, in strengthening health services; to furnish appropriate technical assistance, and in emergencies, necessary aid; to stimulate and advance work on the prevention and control of epidemic, endemic and other diseases; to promote, in cooperation with other specialized agencies where necessary, the improvement of nutrition, housing, sanitation, recreation, economic or working conditions and other aspects of environmental hygiene; to promote and coordinate biomedical and health services research; to promote improved standards of teaching and training in the health, medical and related professions; to establish and stimulate the establishment of international standards for biological, pharmaceutical and similar products, and to standardize diagnostic procedures; and to foster activities in the field of mental health, especially those activities affecting the harmony of human relations. WHO also proposes conventions, agreements, regulations and makes recommendations about international nomenclature of diseases, causes of death and public health practices. It develops, establishes and promotes international standards concerning foods and biological, pharmaceutical and similar substances.

Review Date: January 05, 2009

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